Weave n Gangs

 

Weave n Gangs

 

                Man, where do I start? I was inspired to write Weave ‘n’ Gangs by some very personal experiences of mine. First, I would like to say that, every black woman that wears a weave is not insecure. Some black women will wear their hair in various styles, including a natural fashion, depending on the situation. Next, every black man who is in a gang is not insecure either. I understand that in many areas of the country, young men are often born into gangs. I am from Jersey City, New Jersey. Growing up as a kid, the Bloods and Crips were gangs I only saw in west coast movies. The gangs in my neighborhood were usually based on where a person lived, or who he or she was related to. By the time I turned 16, I realized that the gang culture had spread rapidly on the East Coast. So, my perspective on gangs is strictly from the view of my neighborhood. It also hit very close to home when my younger brother decided to join the bloods. It hurt me because even though his father was absent, I always tried to speak life and positivity into him as a brother/guardian/ and mentor. “ You a blood, that just another sign of your weakness”, derives from my frustration of watching my little brother be sentenced to 5 years in prison after one of his “homies” snitched on him. Those lyrics were my truth and honesty. Many of our young men join gangs to compensate for absent male figures in the house hold. They just want a family. As, for the ladies, as a race and culture I can relate to the subconscious self hate. Sometimes we just don’t realize that we have been conditioned to think a certain way. I watch many black women that I know personally, with hair that is more beautiful than the weave that they wear, spend hundreds of dollars on Brazilian hair. Many women in our culture don’t even realize that they are trying to look European. They are putting so much emphasis on looking like real life Barbie dolls, that they ignore the natural beauty possessed by black women. ” When I was 8, I wanted to Al B. Sure cuz he was light skin with good hair”. Those lyrics are a testimony to my own self hate as a child. I wanted to have lighter skin because everything that was positive on television was of a lighter complexion. ( Batman, Superman etc) I can relate ladies. In a nutshell, I wanted to spark a conversation about our insecurities as a race and culture, that at the very least could spark a thought, that could lead to a change in at least one person. Thank You.

 

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